Academic

My Computer Gave Me a Mental Disorder: Stories About the Web, its Effects, Internet Addiction, and DSM-V

Abstract:

Ever since stories have been told, people have told them about technology. These narratives of technology represent one way new innovations such as the Internet get positioned and become understood in culture and society. In the case of Internet technology, both utopian and dystopian narratives have developed regarding its effects on society, culture, and the human brain. Some storytellers claim the Internet causes both changes in the brain and addiction, while others say this technology is simply the newest iteration in a long line of communication advancements. The process of finalizing the fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) resulted in several narratives from prominent psychiatrists. Some of these psychiatrists called for the inclusion of a proposed Internet Addiction Disorder in the newest version of the DSM, while others sought to see the new disorder kept out. These narratives of legitimacy through inclusion or exclusion in the DSM provide a clear-cut example of how competing narratives come to define how society and culture understand the effects of new technology.

Reference:

Krull, C. (2013). My computer gave me a mental disorder: Stories about the web, its effects, internet addiction, and DSM-V (master’s thesis). Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA.

 

Work-Related Communication Technology Use Outside of Regular Work Hours and Work Life Conflict: The Influence of Communication Technologies on Perceived Work Life Conflict, Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover Intentions

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to investigate employee perceptions of the influence of communication technology use outside of regular work hours on perceptions of work life conflict, burnout, turnover intentions, and job satisfaction. An online survey of 168 employees from more than 30 companies in a Midwestern city was conducted to assess relationships among these variables. The results indicated that hours of work-related communication technology use outside of regular work hours contributed to perceptions of work life conflict. However, positive attitudes toward communication technologies predicted decreased work life conflict. Controlling for worker age, perceived life stress, and attitudes toward communication technologies, work life conflict was found to predict job burnout and job satisfaction, but not turnover intentions. The authors discuss implications of the study findings for management practices, limitations of the study, and directions for future research.

Reference:

Wright, K. B., Abendschein, B., Wombacher, K., O’Connor, K., Hoffman, M., Dempsey, M., Krull, C., Dewes, A. & Audrey, S. (2014). Work-related communication technology use outside of regular work hours and work life conflict: The influence of communication technologies on perceived work life conflict, burnout, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions. Management Communication Quarterly, 28(4), 1-24. doi: 10.1177/0893318914533332

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